Admin

School Nurse

Welcome from Gwen Natyzak, R.N.
Boonsboro Elementary School Nurse for 16 years
and 29 years as a Registered Nurse

 Contact me with any questions or concerns at (434) 384-2881
Email:  gnatyzak@bedford.k12.va.us
Clinic hours:  7:15 - 2:45


Health Forms
Immunization Requirements
School Entrance Health Form
Physician and Parent Authorization to Administer Medication Form
Oral Antihistamines Parent Authorization Form
Asthma Healthcare Plan and Medication Authorization Form
Acute Concussion Short Term Care Plan




Why is it important to get a flu vaccine during the COVID-19 pandemic?
Efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19, such as stay-at-home and shelter-in-place orders, have led to decreased use of routine preventive medical services, including immunization services. Ensuring that people continue or start getting routine vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic is essential for protecting people and communities from vaccine-preventable diseases and outbreaks, including flu. Routine vaccination prevents illnesses that lead to unnecessary medical visits and hospitalizations, which further strain the healthcare system.

For the upcoming flu season, flu vaccination will be very important to reduce flu because it can help reduce the overall impact of respiratory illnesses on the population and thus lessen the resulting burden on the healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A flu vaccine may also provide several individual health benefits, including keeping you from getting sick with flu, reducing the severity of your illness if you do get flu and reducing your risk of a flu-associated hospitalization.

 

Holiday Season Travel


The winter holiday season is a time when many families travel long distances to celebrate together. Travel increases the chance of getting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. If you must travel, be informed of the risks involved.




If you decide to travel, follow these safety measures during your trip to protect yourself and others from COVID-19:


  • Wear a mask to keep your nose and mouth covered when in public places.
  • Avoid close contact by staying at least 6 feet apart (about 2 arms’ length) from anyone who is not from your household.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid contact with anyone who is sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.


Celebration Tips

A family celebrates the holidays while practicing mask wearing, social distancing, and ventilation recommendations.


The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful and isolating for many people. Gatherings during the upcoming holidays can be an opportunity to reconnect with family and friends. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 epidemic is worsening, and small household gatherings are an important contributor to the rise in COVID-19 cases. Holiday celebrations will likely need to be different this year to prevent the spread of COVID-19. When you talk with your friends and family about plans, it’s okay if you decide to stay home and remain apart from others. Hard choices to be apart this year may mean that you can spend many more years with your loved ones. 

Consider activities that pose lower risk of spreading COVID-19. Additionally, CDC offers these considerations to slow the spread of COVID-19 during small gatherings. Celebrating virtually or with members of your own household (who are consistently taking measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19) poses the lowest risk for spread. Your household is anyone who currently lives with you and shares common spaces in your housing unit (such as your house or apartment). This can include family members, roommates, or people who are unrelated to you. People who do not currently live in your housing unit, such as college students who are returning home from school for the holidays, should be considered part of different households. In-person gatherings that bring together family members or friends from different households, including college students returning home, pose varying levels of risk. 

Traditional Thanksgiving gatherings with family and friends are fun but can increase the chances of getting or spreading COVID-19 or the fluFollow these tips to make your Thanksgiving holiday safer

These considerations are meant to supplement—not replace—any state, local, territorial, or tribal health and safety laws, rules, and regulations with which all gatherings must comply. 

Holiday Season Shopping



In-person shopping at crowded stores is a high-risk activity that may lead to the spread of COVID-19. Consider virtual shopping or curbside pickup instead. If you decide to go shopping in person, take steps to protect yourself:



  • Wear a mask in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when social is distancing is difficult.
  • When you do have to visit in person, go during hours when fewer people will be there (for example, early morning). 
  • If you are at higher risk for severe illness, find out if the store has special hours for people at higher risk. If they do, try to shop during those hours.
  • If you normally bring your own reusable shopping bags, ensure they are cleaned before each use. Some locations have temporarily banned the use of reusable shopping bags during the COVID-19 pandemic, so check your state, local, store, or market policies before bringing reusable bags.
  • Disinfect the shopping cart; use disinfecting wipes if available.
  • Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others while shopping and in lines.
  • Use marked entry or exit points and follow any directional signs or floor markings designed to keep people at least 6 feet apart.
  • Touch only products that you plan to purchase, if possible.
  • Consider not consuming any sample or purchase food or drink items from self-service stations.
  • If possible, use touchless payment options (pay without touching money, a card, or a keypad). If you must handle money, a card, or use a keypad, use hand sanitizer right after paying.
  • Before entering and after exiting the grocery store or market, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • When you get home, and before preparing or eating food, wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. 


 


 



3 W's to reduce your risk of COVID-19

Wear a mask
Wash your hands
Watch your distance ( keep 6 feet of space between you and your friends)

COVID-19 Resources:
Virginia Department of Health

http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/surveillance-and-investigation/novel-coronavirus/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html



Recommendations to support and protect children’s emotional well-being during the pandemic

Create a safe physical and emotional environment by practicing the 3 R’s: Reassurance, Routines, and Regulation.

First, adults should reassure children about their safety and the safety of loved ones, and tell them that it is adults’ job to ensure their safety. Second, adults should maintain routines to provide children with a sense of safety and predictability (e.g., regular bedtimes and meals, daily schedules for learning and play). And third, adults should support children’s development of regulation. When children are stressed, their bodies respond by activating their stress response systems. To help them manage these reactions, it is important to both validate their feelings (e.g., “I know that this might feel scary or overwhelming”) and encourage them to engage in activities that help them self-regulate (e.g., exercise, deep breathing, mindfulness or meditation activities, regular routines for sleeping and eating). In addition, it is essential to both children’s emotional and physical well-being to ensure that families can meet their basic needs (e.g., food, shelter, clothing). 

Increase children’s self-efficacy.

Self-efficacy is the sense of having agency or control—an especially important trait during times of fear and uncertainty. Children often feel more in control when they can play an active role in helping themselves, their families, and their communities. For example, children can help by following safety guidelines (e.g., washing their hands), preparing for home confinement (e.g., helping to cook and freeze food), or volunteering in the community (e.g., writing letters or creating art for older adults or sick friends, sharing extra supplies with a neighbor).

Emphasize strengths, hope, and positivity.

Children need to feel safe, secure, and positive about their present and future. Adults can help by focusing children’s attention on stories about how people come together, find creative solutions to difficult problems, and overcome adversity during the epidemic. Talking about these stories can be healing and reassuring to children and adults alike.

Read the full article here:   https://www.childtrends.org/publications/resources-for-supporting-childrens-emotional-well-being-during-the-covid-19-pandemic


 

Resources for children on COVID-19 and staying healthy

BrainPOP: Coronavirus (4-minute video, activities, and games)

National Public Radio: Just for Kids: A Comic Exploring the New Coronavirus

PBS Kids: How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (includes a list of videos, games, and activities about handwashing and staying healthy at the bottom of the article)

Sesame Street:  https://www.sesamestreet.org/caring
Content you can use to spark playful learning, offer children comfort, and breathe deeply together. 



  Medication Administration Reminder (includes cough drops):
  • Please do not send medication or cough drops to school by your child.
  • A parent or guardian needs to bring all medicine to school.
  • All medicine must be in the original container.
  • A parent or guardian signature is required on our authorization form before medication will be administered.
No nebulizer treatments will be administered at school. A spacer is required for inhalers.


Healthy Tips

  • Encourage your child to eat breakfast at home or school every day.
  • Make sure your child gets at least 8 hours of sleep each night.
  • Teach your children to wash their hands well and often with soap and water.
  • Sneakers are best for active participation and safety.

 

Student Wellness Policy
The objectives of our Student Wellness Policy are to promote student health and reduce childhood obesity. Teachers are using other options for instruction/incentives rather than food items. Attention to individual student allergies and health care plans within the class population is required. No sharing of outside food and drinks among students. Do not send cupcakes, candy, or food treats for birthday celebrations.

  • Celebrations with food are limited to three times per year per class.
  • Food items are to be selected from BCPS Healthy Snack List or from our school cafeteria. 
  • Teachers must notify parents of events involving foods.      

 

SchoolCare (formerly CareDox)
Bedford County Public Schools are utilizing SchoolCare as a  tool for nurses to notify parents when their child visits the clinic as well as for parents to provide us with accurate medical information. All information is stored securely and is HIPAA and FERPA compliant. You will receive an email directly from SchoolCare with a personalized link to establish your child's record electronically.


You may email the Parent Support Team at SchoolCare if you have not received an email from them. 
Their email address:   Activation@CareDox.com

Facts about CareDox are located at this link: 
www.caredox.com/category-faq/parents/

   

 
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Article on smartphone use
Article on smartphone use
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